Places with History

Traditionally, the main industries of the region were dairying, beef cattle and sheep grazing, fruit and vegetable growing and forestry. In more recent times, construction, tourism and the wine industry are growing in economic importance as the local population grows at a rate of almost 5 per cent every year.

Busselton Heritage Park and Trail

The Heritage Park and Trail starts at the corner of Peel Terrace and Causeway Road, Busselton and features a range of sculptures which aim to link the past and present. The Heritage Trail also includes the Aboriginal Interpretive Gardens, St Mary’s Anglican Church and the Pioneer Cemetery.  

Busselton Historic Museum

Located at the Old Butter Factory, the Busselton Historic Museum showcases many interesting displays of old photographs, antique furniture, clothing, farm machinery and butter and cheese making equipment. There is also a fully furnished old group settlement home and school on site. Open daily from 10-4pm (closed on Tuesday). Entry fee applies.

CourtHouse Arts Complex

The Old Courthouse complex at the jetty end of Queen Street was built in 1854. Comprising a courtroom, jail cells, stable, post office, sergeant’s quarters and bond store, the Courthouse was Busselton’s first seat of justice. It comprises of the ArtGeo Gallery, Artists' in residence studios and craft exhibition space. Phone 9751 4651. Open daily.

Newtown House

Located 10km south of Busselton on the corner of Bussell and Vasse Highways, this early colonial farmhouse and dairy has been beautifully restored and is surrounded by pretty gardens. Newtown house now has a restaurant and bed and breakfast accommodation.

St Mary’s Anglican Church

Built of limestone and jarrah with a sheoak shingle roof, St Mary’s Anglican Church is the oldest stone church in WA. Building commenced in 1844 and the church was consecrated in 1848. St Mary’s Church is located opposite the Busselton Visitor Centre.

Wonnerup House

The Wonnerup Settlement, situated 10km north of Busselton is an important example of early farming first settled by the Layman family in 1834. The landmark Wonnerup Homestead was built in 1859 and the house (which was later converted to a dairy) was built in 1837. Also featured on the property is a kitchen, stables, blacksmiths, teacher house and school. These buildings have been meticulously restored. On display are many original items and furniture. Open daily 10am – 4pm. Entry fee applies. Closed Monday and Tuesday.