FAQ Health

To help you access information on common environmental health issues, the City has covered a range of topics below.

Can the City help me with a noise issue?

The Environmental Protection (Noise) Regulations 1997 specify the allowed decibel levels depending on the day and time. The regulations ensure acceptable levels are met, with flexibility to allow normal activities to occur. For a better understanding of these regulations, please view our Noise Information Sheet.

In most cases, noise issues are resolved by talking to the people involved, where this has not worked you can lodge a noise enquiry via our Report It form or submit a Noise Investigation Pack.  For anti-social behaviour and after hours noisy parties, contact the Police to lodge a complaint.

Noise Information Sheet

Noise Information Pack

Can I keep chickens?

To keep poultry including fowls, peafowls, turkey, geese and ducks on your property you must ensure the following requirements are met:

  • Poultry are not to exceed 20 in number
  • Poultry are not to be kept within 12 metres of any residential home
  • Poultry are to be kept in and provided with a properly constructed enclosure
  • All enclosures must be kept in a clean condition

My neighbour has a rooster

Roosters cannot be kept in residential zones including rural residential. If you live in a residential area and have a problem rooster, please complete a Report It form and one of our Officers will contact you.

Can I have a beehive?

You can keep up to two beehives on your property following these requirements:

  • A fence or wall encloses the hives on all sides
  • A supply of water must be available within 10 metres of the hives
  • Hives to be kept outside, at least 10 metres away from any building or public place and 5 metres from the lot boundary

I am concerned about asbestos

When asbestos-containing materials are left undisturbed they are relatively harmless, however if the material is damaged or disturbed it may release fibres into the air which can be dangerous to health. The Department of Health WA provides detailed information on asbestos .If you have a concern about asbestos in your neighbourhood please complete a Report It form for an Environmental Health Officer to contact you.

How can I remove asbestos from my property?

If you are planning on removing over 10 square metres of bonded (non-friable) asbestos, you are required to engage an unrestricted asbestos licence holder or a restricted licensed contractor approved by WorkSafe.

When handling less than 10 square metres of asbestos:

DO

  • Wet everything down to reduce the number of airborne fibres
  • Use tools with dust suppression or extraction capabilities
  • Use vacuum equipment designed to extract asbestos fibres or sweep up any dust residues after thoroughly wetting down
  • Wear protective equipment including a respirator (P1 or P2 type), disposable coveralls, safety glasses and disposable gloves

DON’T

  • Use high pressure water hoses or compressed air to clean asbestos sheets
  • Break or damage asbestos materials.

To dispose, triple wrap in heavy duty black plastic and clearly label the package 'CAUTION ASBESTOS'.

The Dunsborough Waste Facility on Vidler Road, Dunsborough accepts asbestos waste Monday to Friday, 7.30am to 3.30pm. Large quantities must be on a pallet. You are encouraged to give at least half an hour's notice before arriving at the waste facility by calling 0417 179 596.

Mould is growing in my house

Mould may grow in homes when conditions are damp, dark and poorly ventilated. Once the cause of the excess moisture encouraging mould growth has been rectified the mould can then be removed. Department of Health WA provide information on this process - see link below. 

If you are renting a property which has a mould problem, your rental agent  should be the first contact. If you need help Tenancy WA: 1800 621 888 may be able to assist you.

Department of Health WA - mould information 

Can I camp on private land?

The WA caravan parks and camping grounds legislation specifies the length of time a person can camp on land which they own or are legally permitted to camp on. The legislation states a person may camp for no longer than three consecutive days in any 28-day period.

 

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